Wright
          Brothers 282nd Aero Composite Squadron - Civil Air Patrol

CADET MILESTONE AWARDS

Wright Brothers Award

The Wright Brothers Award is the CAP Cadet Program's newest milestone award, taking effect on 1 April 2003, in the centennial of Orville and Wilbur Wright's historic first flight. 

Civil Air Patrol, the official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, has a three-fold mission: aerospace education of the American people, emergency services and disaster relief for those in distress, and the cadet program. The cadet program provides opportunities for the learning, maturing, accepting, and nurturing of leadership to over 27,000 young Americans from 12-20 years of age. With advice and assistance from CAP members at national, regional, state and local levels and the US Air Force, cadets are exposed to a structured program of aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness, and moral and ethical values.

This structured program is divided into 16 segments called achievements, each involving study and performance in the five program areas:  leadership, aerospace education, physical fitness, moral leadership, and activities. Upon completion of each achievement, the cadet earns increased responsibility, decorations, awards, eligibility for national and international special activities, and opportunities for both flight and academic scholarships. Completing many of the achievements also earn the cadet a higher grade.

The first milestone of this endeavor is the Wright Brothers Award, which is earned after completing Phase I, "The Learning Phase," consisting of the first three achievements of the cadet program. In addition, the cadet must pass an challenging examination testing leadership knowledge and proficiency in drill and ceremonies.

Once a cadet earns the Wright Brothers Award, they are promoted to the grade of cadet staff sergeant, begin service as cadet non-commissioned officers, and continue to participate and advance as cadets in the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol.

Name

CIGRANG, JEFFREY R.

BRIGHT, AUSTEN A.

TOLLE, MATTHEW D.

TOLLE, JOSHUA L.

CURRIER, SAMANTHA N.

BLEVINS, NATHAN D.

MAKOWSKI, MICHAEL R.

DENNIS IV, ALBERT H.

KOELLER, DUSTIN A.

FECHER, NATALIE H.

DOCKUM, TYLER R.

YOUNG, JOSHUA

FECHER, BENJAMIN

BOWMAN, JACOB

Date

SEP 2003

NOV 2003

DEC 2003

OCT 2004

JAN 2007

FEB 2007

MAR 2007

APR 2007

APR 2009

NOV 2009

MAR 2010

MAY 2010

JUL 2010

OCT 2010


Mitchell Award

The General Billy Mitchell Award has existed since 1964.  This award honors the late Brigadier General Billy Mitchell, aviation pioneer, advocate, and staunch supporter of an independent Air Force for America.

Civil Air Patrol, the official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, has a three-fold mission: aerospace education of the American people, emergency services and disaster relief for those in distress, and the cadet program.  The cadet program provides opportunities for the learning, maturing, accepting, and nurturing of leadership to over 26,000 young Americans from 12-20 years of age.  With advice and assistance from CAP members at national, regional, state, and local levels and the U.S. Air Force, cadets are exposed to a structured program of aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness, and moral and ethical values.

This structured program is divided into 16 segments called achievements, involving study and performance in the five program areas.  Upon completion of each achievement, the cadet earns increased responsibility, decorations, awards, eligibility for national and international special activities, and opportunities for both flight and academic scholarships.  Completing many of the achievements also earn the cadet a higher grade.

The second milestone of this endeavor is the General Billy Mitchell Award which is earned after completing the first eight achievements of the cadet program.  In addition, the cadet must also pass an arduous 100 question examination testing leadership theory and aerospace topics. Since its inception over 30 years ago, over 42,000 cadets have earned this honor.

Being such an important milestone in the CAP cadet program, the Mitchell Award is normally presented by a CAP group commander or higher, the wing director of cadet programs, or a state or federal government official.  Once the cadet earns the Mitchell Award, they are promoted to the grade of Cadet Second Lieutenant.  These cadets, who later enter the CAP's Senior Member program, are eligible for immediate promotion to CAP Second Lieutenant at age 21.

Those cadets who receive the Mitchell Award are also eligible for advanced placement in the grade of E-3 (Airman First Class) should they choose to enlist in the U.S. Air Force (AETCI 36-2002, Chapter 2, Table 2.1).  They are also eligible for advanced credit in the Air Force ROTC program (AFROTCI 36-2011, 2.5.6).  Mitchell Award cadets may also apply for a variety of scholarships and CAP special activities.

Name

MERRICK, BRIAN F.

HERBERT, JOHN J.

ADAMS, JOHNNY L.

SHABLAK, DAVID J.

BAKER, DOUGLAS W.

THOMPSON, RONALD D.

STEVENS, NATHANIEL B.

SCHELLE, CHRISTOPHER A.

STEVENS, BENJAMIN A.

THOMPSON, LAURA E.

COMSTOCK, APRIL A.

LEWIS, CHRISTINA M.

SHOUGH, JOSHUA D.

VECCHI, CHRISTOPHER A.

COUCH, BRANDON M.

MAHAM, JORDAN L.

TEBO JR., DANIEL L.

BRIGHT, AUSTEN A.

TOLLE, MATTHEW D.

CURRIER, SAMANTHA N.

BLEVINS, NATHAN D.

DENNIS, ALBERT H. IV

Date

MAR 1991

DEC 1991

JAN 1993

JUN 1993

MAY 1994

MAY 1994

DEC 1994

MAY 1995

JAN 1996

JUN 1996

JUN 1997

JAN 1998

MAR 1998

JAN 1999

JUL 2002

JUL 2002

JUL 2002

SEP 2005

MAR 2007

AUG 2008

AUG 2010

FEB 2011


Earhart Award

The Amelia Earhart Award has existed since 1964.  This award honors the late Amelia Earhart, aviatrix, advocate, and pioneer, who set many records for women aviators in aviation's infancy, and who was lost while attempting to be the first woman to circumnavigate the globe.

Civil Air Patrol, the official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, has a three-fold mission: aerospace education of the American people, emergency services and disaster relief for those in distress, and the cadet program.  The cadet program provides opportunities for the learning, maturing, accepting, and nurturing of leadership to over 26,000 young Americans from 12-20 years of age.  With advice and assistance from CAP members at national, regional, state, and local levels and the U.S. Air Force, cadets are exposed to a structured program of aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness, and moral and ethical values.

This structured program is divided into 16 segments called achievements, involving study and performance in the five program areas.  Upon completion of each achievement, the cadet earns increased responsibility, decorations, awards, eligibility for national and international special activities, and opportunities for both flight and academic scholarships.  Completing many of the achievements also earn the cadet a higher grade.

The third milestone of this endeavor is the Amelia Earhart Award which is earned after completing the first eleven achievements of the cadet program and receipt of the General Billy Mitchell Award.  In addition, the cadet must pass an arduous 100 question examination testing aerospace knowledge, leadership theory, and staff topics.  Since its inception over 30 years ago, nearly 12000 cadet have earned this prestigious award.

Being such an important milestone in the CAP cadet program, the Earhart Award is normally presented by a CAP Wing Commander or higher, or a state or federal government official.  Once the cadet earns the Earhart Award, they are promoted to the grade of Cadet Captain.  These cadets, who later enter the CAP's Senior Member program, are eligible for immediate promotion to CAP First Lieutenant at age 21.

Those cadets who receive the Earhart Award also enjoy all the benefits of the Mitchell Award (advanced placement as an E-3 in the US Air Force, scholarship and activity opportunities, etc.) and also are eligible to apply to the International Air Cadet Exchange.  IACE is an organization dedicated to fostering international understanding, goodwill, and fellowship among the youth of the world, using the common bond of aviation.  Approximately 100 cadets per year are asked to participate in this extraordinary program.

Name

MERRICK, BRIAN F.

ADAMS, JOHNNY L.

THOMPSON, RONALD D.

BAKER, DOUGLAS W.

STEVENS, NATHANIEL B.

SCHELLE, CHRISTOPHER A.

DETOMASO, STEVEN A.

THOMPSON, LAURA E.

COMSTOCK, APRIL A.

VECCHI, CHRISTOPHER A.

TEBO JR., DANIEL L.

BRIGHT, AUSTEN A.

Date

NOV 1991

MAY 1994

JAN 1995

JUN 1995

OCT 2005

JAN 2006

FEB 1997

FEB 1997

JUL 1998

NOV 2002

JAN 2003

MAR 2007


Eaker Award

The General Ira C. Eaker Award denotes successful completion of the sixteen achievements of the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program.  CAP's newest award for cadet achievement, it recognizes cadet completion of the academic, leadership, and physical fitness curriculum and structure in existence since 1964.

This award honors the late Air Force General Ira C. Eaker, aviation pioneer, career military officer, and one of the chief architects and visionaries of the US Air Force.

Civil Air Patrol, the official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, has a three-fold mission: aerospace education of the American people, emergency services and disaster relief for those in distress, and the cadet program.  The cadet program provides opportunities for the learning, maturing, accepting, and nurturing of leadership to over 26,000 young Americans from 12-20 years of age.  With advice and assistance from CAP members at national, regional, state, and local levels and the U.S. Air Force, cadets are exposed to a structured program of aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness, and moral and ethical values.

This structured program is divided into 16 segments called achievements, involving study and performance in the five program areas.  Upon completion of each achievement, the cadet earns increased responsibility, decorations, awards, eligibility for national and international special activities, and opportunities for both flight and academic scholarships.  Completing many of the achievements also earn the cadet a higher grade.

The General Ira C. Eaker Award is the fourth milestone in the Cadet Program.  This award is earned for completion of all sixteen achievements.  Additionally, the cadet must graduate from the national level Cadet Officer School, a Region Cadet Leadership School, or complete the AFIADL 13 test to be eligible for this award.  Approximately 100 cadets each year complete Phase IV and will receive the Eaker Award.

In recognizing the accomplishments of cadets who receive the Eaker Award, CAP recommends that it be presented by a CAP Region Commander or higher, or a state or federal government elected official.  Once the Eaker Award is earned, the cadet is promoted to the grade of Cadet Lieutenant Colonel and is then eligible to test for the General Carl A. Spaatz Award, the highest honor attainable in the Cadet Program.

Name

THOMPSON, RONALD D.

SCHELLE, CHRISTOPHER A.

THOMPSON, LAURA E.

DETOMASO, STEVEN A.

Date

OCT 1996

JAN 1997

NOV 1997

JUN 1998


Spaatz Award

The General Carl A. Spaatz Award, Civil Air Patrol's highest cadet award, has existed since 1965.  The award honors the late General Spaatz, who became the first Air Force Chief of Staff on 26 September 1947.  General Spaatz was also CAP's first National Board chairman, a position he held from 28 May 1948 to 27 April 1959.

Civil Air Patrol, the official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, has a three-fold mission: aerospace education of the American people, emergency services and disaster relief for those in distress, and the cadet program.  The cadet program provides opportunities for the learning, maturing, accepting, and nurturing of leadership to over 26,000 young Americans from 12-20 years of age.  With advice and assistance from CAP members at national, regional, state, and local levels and the U.S. Air Force, cadets are exposed to a structured program of aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness, and moral and ethical values.

This structured program is divided into 16 segments called achievements, involving study and performance in the five program areas.  Upon completion of each achievement, the cadet earns increased responsibility, decorations, awards, eligibility for national and international special activities, and opportunities for both flight and academic scholarships.  Completing many of the achievements also earn the cadet a higher grade.

The last milestone award is the General Carl A. Spaatz Award which is earned after completing all 16 achievements and then passing a rigorous four-part examination.  The exam, which may only be taken three times, consists of written tests in aerospace education and leadership, a written essay, and a physical fitness test.  The Spaatz examination is very difficult and demanding; only 20 percent of the examinees have achieved passing scores to date, and it is earned by less than one percent of all CAP cadets who enter the program.

The first cadet to earn this award was Douglas C. Roach, of the Michigan Wing.  Cadet Roach was presented his Spaatz Award on 25 January 1965.  The Michigan cadet later became an Air Force pilot and flew with the US Air Force aerial demonstration team, the Thunderbirds.

As CAP's most prestigious cadet award, the Spaatz Award is normally presented by an Air Force or CAP general officer, an elected state or federal official, or a cabinet level official.  Once cadets earn the Spaatz Award they are promoted to the rank of Cadet Colonel.  These cadets, who later enter the senior member program, are eligible for immediate promotion to CAP Captain at age 21.

Name

MERRICK, BRIAN F.

CROSS, HEATHER N. M.

ADAMS, JOHNNY L.

THOMPSON, RONALD D.

THOMPSON, LAURA E.

Date

SEP 1992

AUG 1995

JULY 1996

FEB 1997

FEB1998

 

 

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